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Ferric Chloride solution 40% (40-45 Baume)

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100ml £12.49 £14.99
500ml £12.82 £15.39
1L £13.74 £16.49
5L £18.32 £21.99
10L £26.66 £31.99
20L £40.83 £48.99
£14.99
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FERRIC CHLORIDE 40%

IRON (III) CHLORIDE SOLUTION

Technical grade

  • Other Names: Iron trichloride, Ferric chloride, Molysite, Flores martis
  • Formula: FeCl3
  • UN No. 2582
  • CAS No. 7705-08-0
  • Appearance: brown/orange liquid
  • % Ferric chloride: 40%
  • pH: 1.5
  • Boiling Point: >100C
  • SG: 40 - 45 Baume
  • Density: 1.35 - 1.45 g/cm3

Uses for Ferric chloride

Ferric Chloride forms a corrosive solution which is used as a coagulant in sewage and wastewater treatment and drinking water production. It is used to remove suspended solids and particulate matter from water. As a flocculant it has the function of precipitating heavy metals and sulfides, bleaching, deodorization, degreasing, sterilizing, dephosphorizing and decreasing the COD & BOD of effluent water.

It is commonly used as an etchant for copper-based metals in printed circuit boards. Iron(III) chloride etches copper in a two-step redox reaction to copper(I) chloride and then to copper(II) chloride in the production of printed circuit boards. "Click Here" for instructions on how to make up etching solution. See below for Neutralising Ferric Chloride Solution

For further information on using Citric acid as a catalyst with ferric chloride for copper and brass in the Edinburgh Etch "Click Here"

Other uses include:

  • The anhydrous Ferric chloride is a powerful dehydrating agent and is used as a drying agent in certain reactions.
  • Staining blades of swords and knives.
  • Etching the widmanstatten pattern in iron meteorites.
  • For the etching of photogravure plates for printing photographic and fine art images in intaglio and for etching rotogravure cylinders used in the printing industry.
  • In the manufacture of pigments and inks.
  • Used in veterinary practice to treat overcropping of an animal's claws.
  • Sometimes used in the technique of Raku firing as an additive during the reduction process, turning a pottery piece a burnt orange color due to the iron content present in the reducing atmosphere.
  • Used to test the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels and other alloys.
  • It is also used as a leaching agent in chloride hydrometallurgy. Used in the chlorination of silver and copper ores.
  • Iron(III) chloride is used as catalyst for the reaction of ethylene with chlorine, forming ethylene dichloride (1,2-dichloroethane), an important commodity chemical, which is mainly used for the industrial production of vinyl chloride, the monomer for making PVC.
  • As an oxidiser and mordant in dyeing and printing textiles.
  • In the construction industry it can enhance the unit strength of concrete when adding a little of ferric chloride solution to the concrete mix.
  • Used by American coin collectors to identify the dates of Buffalo nickels that are so badly worn that the date is no longer visible.
  • Ferric chloride is used to make red-brown rosinates in varnishes.

Ferric chloride In the laboratory

iron(III) chloride is commonly employed as a Lewis acid for catalysing reactions such as chlorination of aromatic compounds and Friedel-Crafts reaction of aromatics. It forms adducts with Lewis bases such as triphenylphosphine oxide, e.g. FeCl3(OPPh3)2.

Iron(III) chloride is a mild oxidising agent, for example, it is capable of oxidising copper(I) chloride to copper(II) chloride.

When heated with iron(III) oxide at 350C, iron(III) chloride gives iron oxychloride.

Reducing agents such as hydrazine convert iron(III) chloride to complexes of iron(II).

Reacts with cyclopentadienyl magnesium bromide in one preparation of ferrocene, a metal-sandwich complex.

Used in conjunction with NaI in acetonitrile to mildly reduce organic azides to primary amines.

It is used to produce Weigerts iron hematoxylin solution for nuclear stains and trichrome staining.

Other uses include:

Staining blades of swords and knives. Etching the widmanstatten pattern in iron meteorites. For the etching of photogravure plates for printing photographic and fine art images in intaglio and for etching rotogravure cylinders used in the printing industry and for making printed circuit boards(PCBs) Used in veterinary practice to treat overcropping of an animal's claws Reacts with cyclopentadie­nylmagnesium bromide in one preparation of ferrocene, a metal-sandwich complex. Sometimes used in the technique of Raku firing as an additive during the reduction process, turning a pottery piece a burnt orange color due to the iron content present in the reducing atmosphere. Used to test the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels and other alloys. Used in conjunction with NaI in acetonitrile to mildly reduce organic azides to primary amines.

 

Neutralising Ferric Chloride Solution:

Ferric chloride solution can be neutralised with Soda ash / sodium carbonate. The ferric chloride solution and the sodium carbonate should be mixed together on a 1:1 ratio (i.e. 1kg sodium carbonate will neutralise 1L of ferric chloride solution). Neutralisation will produce gasses so it is important to carry out the procedure in a well ventilated area and wear all necessary safety protective gear. After 10 to 15 minutes a solid precipitate should form and this can then be disposed of.

 

PLEASE NOTE: This product is not for human or animal consumption.

 

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